1. One in seven babies born with low birthweight: Study - The Jakarta Post  Jakarta Post
  2. 16 May 2019 News release Too many babies are born too small  World Health Organization
  3. Countries face a "wake-up" call as 20 million babies are born underweight every year  The Telegraph
  4. Countries must up their game to reduce low birth weights, warns UN-backed report  UN News
  5. UNICEF-WHO Low Birthweight Estimates: Levels and trends 2000-2015  UNICEF
  6. View full coverage on Google News
More than 20 million newborns in 2015 -- one in seven -- came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birthweight, published Thursday.More than 20 million newborns in 2015 -- one in seven -- came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birthweight, published Thursday.

One in seven babies born with low birthweight: Study - Parents - The Jakarta Post

Many countries need to invest more and take greater action to reduce the number of babies born with low birth weights which put their health at risk, urges a United Nations-backed report released on Wednesday.Many countries need to invest more and take greater action to reduce the number of babies born with low birth weights which put their health at risk, urges a United Nations-backed report released on Wednesday.

Countries must up their game to reduce low birth weights, warns UN-backed report | UN News

More than 20 million babies were born underweight in 2015, according to the first global estimates of low-weight newborns – a figure experts say is a “wake-up call” for governments.More than 20 million babies were born underweight in 2015, according to the first global estimates of low-weight newborns – a figure experts say is a “wake-up call” for governments.

Countries face a "wake-up" call as 20 million babies are born underweight every year

LBW is defined as a birth weight of any infant of 2,499g or lessLBW is defined as a birth weight of any infant of 2,499g or less

More Irish babies are being born with a low birth weight, new study reveals - Irish Mirror Online

403 Missing Auth Token

For the first time, the World Health Organization has estimated how well the world is doing to prevent low-weight births. The progress is too slow, researchers say.For the first time, the World Health Organization has estimated how well the world is doing to prevent low-weight births. The progress is too slow, researchers say.

Chart: Which Countries Are Best At Preventing Low-Weight Births? : Goats and Soda : NPR

“New data on a neglected issue: Around 1 in 7 babies are born with low birthweight, and will face greater #health risks through their life https://t.co/9dm9BDSQLg”

Peter Salama on Twitter: "New data on a neglected issue: Around 1 in 7 babies are born with low birthweight, and will face greater #health risks through their life https://t.co/9dm9BDSQLg"

“On on on. Disclaimer: Using baby weights cos I was in the middle of skull crushers but switched to pressing for the vid. https://t.co/5WXE66SVEN”

Jack Carroll on Twitter: "On on on. Disclaimer: Using baby weights cos I was in the middle of skull crushers but switched to pressing for the vid.… https://t.co/KWSTWBd7dl"

Around one in seven of all babies worldwide are born with a low birthweight16 May 2019 – More than 20 million babies were born with a low birthweight (less than 2500g; 5.5 pounds) in 2015—around one in seven of all births worldwide according to the first-ever estimates documenting this major health challenge. These findings and more are documented in a new research paper developed by experts from the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, published in The Lancet Global Health.More than 80% of the world’s 2.5 million newborns who die every year are of low birthweight. Those low birthweight babies who survive have a greater risk of stunting, and developmental and physical ill health later in life, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “Low birthweight is a complex clinical entity composed of intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth,” says co-author Dr Mercedes de Onis from the Department of Nutrition at WHO.“This is why reducing low birthweight requires an understanding of the underlying causes in a given country. For example, in Southern Asia a large proportion of low birthweight babies are born at term but with intrauterine growth restriction, which is associated with maternal undernutrition, including maternal stunting. “Conversely, preterm birth is the major contributor to low birthweight in settings with many adolescent pregnancies, high prevalence of infection, or where pregnancy is associated with high levels of fertility treatment and caesarean sections (like in USA and Brazil). Understanding and tackling these underlying causes in high-burden countries should be a priority.”Although close to three-quarters were born in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, the problem remains substantial in high-income countries in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. High-income countries have seen virtually no progress. What is being done to tackle this major public health problemReducing the incidence of low birth weight requires a comprehensive global strategy, which must include improving maternal nutritional status; treating pregnancy-associated conditions such as pre-eclampsia (hypertensive disease of pregnancy); and providing adequate maternal care, perinatal clinical services and social support.Affordable, accessible and appropriate health-care is critical for preventing and treating low birthweight. Reductions in death, illness and disability in newborn babies will only be achieved if pregnancy care is fully integrated with appropriate care for low birthweight babies.Around one in seven of all babies worldwide are born with a low birthweight16 May 2019 – More than 20 million babies were born with a low birthweight (less than 2500g; 5.5 pounds) in 2015—around one in seven of all births worldwide according to the first-ever estimates documenting this major health challenge. These findings and more are documented in a new research paper developed by experts from the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, published in The Lancet Global Health.More than 80% of the world’s 2.5 million newborns who die every year are of low birthweight. Those low birthweight babies who survive have a greater risk of stunting, and developmental and physical ill health later in life, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “Low birthweight is a complex clinical entity composed of intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth,” says co-author Dr Mercedes de Onis from the Department of Nutrition at WHO.“This is why reducing low birthweight requires an understanding of the underlying causes in a given country. For example, in Southern Asia a large proportion of low birthweight babies are born at term but with intrauterine growth restriction, which is associated with maternal undernutrition, including maternal stunting. “Conversely, preterm birth is the major contributor to low birthweight in settings with many adolescent pregnancies, high prevalence of infection, or where pregnancy is associated with high levels of fertility treatment and caesarean sections (like in USA and Brazil). Understanding and tackling these underlying causes in high-burden countries should be a priority.”Although close to three-quarters were born in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, the problem remains substantial in high-income countries in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand. High-income countries have seen virtually no progress. What is being done to tackle this major public health problemReducing the incidence of low birth weight requires a comprehensive global strategy, which must include improving maternal nutritional status; treating pregnancy-associated conditions such as pre-eclampsia (hypertensive disease of pregnancy); and providing adequate maternal care, perinatal clinical services and social support.Affordable, accessible and appropriate health-care is critical for preventing and treating low birthweight. Reductions in death, illness and disability in newborn babies will only be achieved if pregnancy care is fully integrated with appropriate care for low birthweight babies.

Too many babies are born too small

The top 10 countries with the highest number of underweight newborns are all from South Asia, and Africa, with Bangladesh topping the chart followed by Comoros and Nepal, a global study released on Thursday revealed. 

South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa grapples with underweight newborns - CGTN

UNICEF-WHO Low Birthweight Estimates: Levels and trends 2000-2015 - UNICEF DATA

The World Health Organisation on Thursday revealed that too many babies were being born too small as over 20 million babies were born with low birt...The World Health Organisation on Thursday revealed that too many babies were being born too small as over 20 million babies were born with low birth weight (less than 2500g; 5.5 pounds) in 2015. ...

Too many babies born too small, says WHO – Punch Newspapers

The World Health Organisation on Thursday revealed that too many babies were being born too small as over 20 million babies were born with low birth weight (less than 2500g; 5.5 pounds) in 2015. ...

Too many babies born too small, says WHO – Punch Newspapers

"High-income countries have seen virtually no progress," the study finds"High-income countries have seen virtually no progress," the study finds

More than 20 million newborns in 2015 -- one in seven -- came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birth weight, published Thursday. More than 20 million newborns in 2015 -- one in seven -- came into the world weighing too little, according to a global assessment of birth weight, published Thursday.

1 in 7 babies born with low birth weight: study | ABS-CBN News